SCIENCE 2.0

Video

Science 2.0 explained

 

The concept of Science 2.0 picks up on a phenomenon that has been going on for some time, but whose mechanisms of action have not yet been researched: the gradual shift of science towards entirely different and primarily digital means of participation, communication, collaboration and discourse in the research and publishing processes. Scholars increasingly use wikis, blogs and other collaborative communication channels, such as social networks, to share ideas, theories, concepts and the resulting findings online.

The ZBW investigates how the World Wide Web and its many Web 2.0 applications engender sustained change in the research and publishing processes of the scientific community and what the underlying mechanisms of action are.

Leibniz Research Alliance Science 2.0

The Leibniz Research Alliance Science 2.0 investigates how the internet with its new possibilities, in particular the Social Web, modifies the working habits of researchers in detail, or how existing and traditional research processes can find support from Science 2.0. The ZBW has inititiated the Leibniz Research Network, a consortium of currently 30 institutions that will use the next ten years for a holistic approach to a joint and comprehensive analysis of Science 2.0.

Leibniz Research Alliance Science 2.0

LibRank

(Concluded in 2016)
The LibRank research project engaged in the analysis and optimisation of search results in library information systems. It was funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG). Given the fact that the search habits even of scientists and researchers are characterised by the heavy use of commercial search engines, the project aimed to analyse resp. implement the effects and adaptions for library information systems.

LibRank

EEXCESS – “Enhancing Europe’s eXchange in Cultural Educational and Scientific Resources”

(Concluded in 2016)
The large EU-founded project EEXCESS  used a completely novel approach to information dissemination. It aimed to link web content, such as images, videos, infographics, statistics or texts from social media channels and blogs, with cultural, educational and scientific content in a personalised and contextualised manner.

“Take the content to the user, not the user to the content” was the basic idea of the project according to Professor Klaus Tochtermann, ZBW director.  

The ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics cooperated with ten other European partners in EEXCESS. Within this project, the ZBW was primarily concerned with the design of novel, linked and multidisciplinary information landscapes and with the technical integration of its search engine EconBiz into these environments. The ZBW also ensured that the project’s research findings became part of the public debate and find sustained use.

EEXCESS – “Enhancing Europe’s eXchange in Cultural, Educational and Scientific Resources”